REVIEW: The Gotobeds – “Definitely Not A Redd Kross EP”

Pittsburgh’s The Gotobeds are offering their two cents on a vintage blast of punk energy – and it is mighty good. Dubbed Definitely Not A Red Kross EP, the new 7-inch EP, out tomorrow on Atlanta’s Chunklet Industries, is a six-song cover of – yep, uh huh, you guessed it – Redd Kross’ high-octane debut…

REVIEW: Matt Mehlan – “The Mehlans”

There’s electronic buzzing, post-something refrains, borderline-tribal heat, and occasional Rhodes-and-bass grooves. There’s also, however, more mutant pop bridges than you could swing a dead cat at, if that’s your idea of a good time. The Mehlans – Matt Mehlan’s first record under his birth name, though not the first record he’s recorded solo – is,…

PROFILE: Matt Mehlan (2017)

He’s going it on his own again and it sounds great. Tomorrow, after a decade-plus at the helm of the thought-rock ensemble/b(r)and Skeletons, Matt Mehlan will strike out on his own with the release of a solo record, The Mehlans. The record is alarmingly accessible and totally bizarre – like a fever-dream where you know…

REVIEW: The Gotobeds – “Fucking In The Future +5”

There’s something rough-hewn, authentic and wonderfully immediate about Fucking in the Future +5, a collection of odds and sods from Pittsburgh’s The Gotobeds out Oct. 13 on Comedy Minus One records. Why? Well, some bands, minus all of the bells and whistles and studio sheen, sound half-hearted or, worse yet, like impersonators of themselves on these…

REVIEW: The Seven Fields of Aphelion – “Keep The Ocean Inside”

Dreamy, ethereal, other-worldly – all could be used to describe Keep The Ocean Inside, Pittsburgher Maureen “Maux” Boyle’s engaging sophomore outing as The Seven Fields of Aphelion and her first since 2010’s Periphery. A San Diego musician I once interviewed called composer Harry Partch’s work a kind of Martian folk music; Boyle’s signature brand of ambient-classical also fits the…

REVIEW: Watter – “History of the Future”

Watter – a Louisville post-rock band that’s high in promise due to its parentage, if nothing else – simply fails to deliver on the oft-disjointed but occasionally ambitious History of the Future, its sophomore full-length, out today on Temporary Residence. It’s not that there are not great moments on the record. It’s just that their…

REVIEW: Yes Selma – “Songs of Happiness”

When Chad Beattie, a 24-year-old from Baltimore, first told me about his bedroom project Yes Selma – a Dancer In The Dark nod – he referenced a lot of the Drag City musicians adored by those in the lo-fi singer-songwriter boom of the 1980s and 1990s. And, yes, listening to Yes Selma’s ambitious and ironically…

REVIEW: Tyranny of Dave – “Silence In Brooklyn” b/w “All This 4 U”

The antique-garde is rearing its head again. After seven years of silence, Pinataland founder David Wechsler – whose bizarre orchestrette once emanated from near the epicenter of a NYC micro-scene fascinated with Old World themes, history, and oddball strains of Americana – returns with a self-released 7-inch single. And, man, is it worth tracking down…

REVIEW: Loscil – “Suns” EP

The songs are sparse exercises in stoicism at times, but – like most Loscil recordings, it seems –  there’s a lot percolating beneath the surface. Perhaps less than usual – but still a lot. That appears to be the verdict for Loscil’s Suns, a five-track, 30-minute EP that ruminates on and explores some of the…

PROFILE: King G and The J Krew

Twenty five years ago today, the beat was born. It was the sound of young adults from Louisville – a sprawling collection of collaborators, most of them close friends since childhood – surging with ideas, and busting out with a declaration that they intended to live an unfiltered, untethered life of art and music. It…